HISTORY - MARCH 2018

 

1519 1681 1695 1775 1822 1846
Struggle for the Great State
 The history of the coast of Texas is a saga of struggle between great international powers for control of new territory. By the 16th century, the Spanish were exploring the Gulf Coast, including the Texas coastal area, looking for land to claim and the gold it might hold. The French also sought a North American empire and sent many expeditions down the Mississippi River to claim land south of its Canadian holdings. Mexico, after its independence from Spain in 1821, explored and patrolled its lands they called Coahuila y Tejas, which included the Quintana area and the regions populated by Stephen F. Austin's colonists. After they won their independence from Mexico, the new Republic of Texas, soon to be the 28th state, began to generate maps of its own, which depicted a land with a bright future.
CLICK LINKS ON THE MAP ABOVE TO VIEW SIX EARLY MAPS OF THE TEXAS GULF COAST

For further reading about maps and to view many digitized historic maps in full detail, investigate some of these links:

 

Texas General Land Office map archives

The GLO has digitized 40,000 maps, sketches, bound volumes, and drawings, all of which you can examine online.

You can purchase full-color reproductions or digital copies of of the items as well.

 

David Rumsey Map Collection

 

San Jacinto Monument Museum

 

Galveston Rosenberg Library

 

Brazoria County Historical Museum

 

The Navigation map above is based on
The Texas Centennial Map, 1936.
The map was designed for the Centennial Exposition held at Fair Park in Dallas, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Texas's independence from Mexico in 1836. It was originally published by Montgomery Ward Co., Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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